Chief Keef Threatens Lupe Fiasco, Laughs Off Lil JoJo’s Death?

Chief Keef is working hard to dig himself into a hole after signing his recent deal with Interscope Records.  Earlier the Chicago rapper seemed to laugh off the tragic shooting death of rival rapper Lil Jojo and now he’s taken aim at Lupe Fiasco. During an interview last week Lupe admitted that he’s scared of the culture that young rappers like Chief Keef promote in Chitown–considering the city’s alarming murder rate–and apparently Keef missed the point completely.


Was Chief Keef’s Twitter Account Really Hacked?

In a tweet on Wednesday (September 5) he had this to say: “Lupe fiasco a hoe ass n—a And wen I see him I’ma smack him like da lil bitch he is #300.” Lupe made it clear he was taking no personal shots at the young rapper, but the tweet set off a series of exchanges between the two of them on Twitter.

Citing Chicago’s alarming murder rate in 2012, Fiasco previously explained that gang culture has turned the city’s impoverished neighborhoods into combat zones. “Chief Keef scares me,” he said in an interview with Baltimore’s 92Q. “Not him specifically, but just the culture that he represents…The murder rate in Chicago is skyrocketing and you see who’s doing it and perpetrating it, they all look like Chief Keef.”

Keef’s hit “I Don’t Like” received a huge co-sign a few months back when Kanye West and G.O.O.D. Music unleashed a remix, but Lupe says that he sees something much more dangerous there. “‘When it comes to the point that, you know, that kids who are doing the killings, and they’re kids 13 to 19-years-old, and you can replicate that in New Orleans, you can replicate that in Oakland. All the kids look the same,” he said.

Lupe Fiasco Breaks Down While Watching Footage Of Old Chicago Neighborhood

Over an hour after the initial tweet, another message from Keef read that his account has been hacked, but there has been no confirmation.

The blowup with Chief Keef comes just a few weeks after Lupe Fiasco appeared on “RapFix Live” and broke down in tears while watching 2006 footage of himself in his old Chicago neighborhood. At first it was difficult to tell what had triggered the tears until Lupe explained that he was seeing “ghosts” in the video–friends who had passed away or had been incarcerated, more victims of Chicago’s inner city.