Heavy D’s Brother Mourns, Says Rapper’s ‘Health Was In Check’

“He loved family, and that’s who he was, but it wasn’t too much different from how he treated his friends and his fans,” his brother, Floyd Myers said. “He showed everybody love and affection, and we’re gonna miss that.”

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From noon to 6p.m. on Thursday (November 17) Heavy D’s fans were given a chance to pay their respects to the late rapper (born, Dwight Errington Myers) at an open memorial service in his hometown Mount Vernon, New York. Throughout the day visitors filed into the church for their last glimpse of the Overweight Lover, while his relatives made an effort to thank each fan individually. After attending the memorial service, MTV News visited the home of Heavy D’s family, who are still grieving over the death of their beloved Dwight Myers.

“Heavy was in great shape,” Floyd Myers, the fallen rapper’s brother and business partner, told MTV News. “You guys seen him at the BET Awards, and he just did the tribute to Michael Jackson; they flew him out to London to do that. Heav was in good shape, healthy, no heart problems. He constantly made sure that his health was in check.”

The initial autopsy report came back inconclusive, but Myers said he spoke to his hitmaking brother the day before he died, and as far as he could tell, there were no signs that he was ill. On records and onscreen, Heavy D promoted love and positivity. Myers assured that his brother was the same way even when the cameras weren’t on him.

“He loved family, and that’s who he was, but it wasn’t too much different from how he treated his friends and his fans,” he said. “He showed everybody love and affection, and we’re gonna miss that.”

“I didn’t realize how he built his legacy and how it stands today because of the things that he has done and has not done over the years,” Myers said of his brother’s dedication to only partake in the positive business ventures. “There was just certain things that Heav just wouldn’t do, and we used to riff at him. We used to be like, ‘Yo, that’s a lot of money you turning down,’ but it wasn’t the right thing to do. Maybe if he would’ve did those things, his legacy would have not been sealed the way it is today.”